The Topic of The ORDER…..

Prevention of noncommunicable diseases in Children and young adults…

It is important for youth to understand non-shared diseases and their dangers. Two-thirds of premature adult deaths are related to the behavior or behavioral behavior of the child: more than 150 million smokers are young, 81% of adolescents are not fit enough, 6 11.7% of adolescents have high episodic mortality rate Children under are overweight or obese8. Recognize unhealthy behaviors and living conditions to ensure that the ill health pains will continue to affect generations. Many young people today have unparalleled access to information and the ability to access this information. Reacting in their own lives and determining their own health status. Young people can help prevent noncommunicable diseases in a variety of ways. With the use of new media, young voices can provide a new perspective on the prevention and control of noncommunicable diseases by exchanging targeted messages on key risk factors and interventions. Young people can connect with different communities and share information about non-shared diseases. Youth can use programs to promote healthy behaviors such as community programs or healthy eating plans. We can contribute to education and awareness initiatives by informing the public and policy makers about health issues and solutions. Young medical students and health students also have the unique opportunity to participate. Students attending clinical rounds can spread effective preventative measures such as smoking cessation
Youth can also work for policies and practices to improve the prevention and protection of non-human diseases.Today, this promise has resulted in insufficient resources and policies to achieve the 25-year goal. Reduce early death rates from noncommunicable diseases by 2025. It is our responsibility to hold our governments to their promises with respect to the 2011 NCP Declaration on Noncommunicable Diseases. We suggest that all noncommunicable disease organizations evaluate how they have won and acted according to the views of young people. The prevention of noncommunicable diseases should be placed on the agenda of international youth groups and included in all curricula for medicine, nursing and related health services. In order to minimize the impact of non-partial diseases, the next generation should be involved in identifying and modifying conditions that promote these diseases. Youth can use programs to promote healthy behaviors such as community programs or healthy eating plans. We can contribute to education and awareness initiatives by informing the public and policy makers about health issues and solutions. Young medical students and health students also have the unique opportunity to participate. Students attending clinical rounds can spread effective preventative measures such as smoking cessation
The growing global burden of non-infectious diseases among poor and poor people is being overlooked by policymakers, major donors, and researchers with many bilateral and bilateral roles. Despite substantial evidence of the magnitude of this burden, prevention of its causes, and this threat is transmitted to tedious health systems, national and international measures are not sufficient. Globalization is an important determinant of non-communicable epidemics as it has a direct impact on demographic risks and indirect effects on national economies and health systems. The globalization of tobacco and alcohol production and marketing campaigns is an example of the challenges faced by manufacturers and public health experts. Political and political measures should be taken by governmental and non-governmental organizations. Unfortunately, the capacity and resources for this answer are not enough.

Despite the fact that the population of developing countries like Ghana is young, there is no accidental policy directive to fight against the ineffective diseases of the younger population. Until recently, public health policy has largely neglected unhealthy diseases of health planning. Amoah et al. He pointed out that Ghana’s health policy before 2005 was very limited in the control and prevention of diabetes, mainly because of the dogma that such diseases are rare among Ghanaians. This apathy towards decision-makers has little to do with the topic of NCD. Meanwhile, the high cost of treating unusual diseases threatens them with the lives of those who suffer from non-partial illnesses, because an average Ghanaian can not afford the cost of care. The lack of coverage of non-AIDS-related diseases in Ghana’s health insurance system also complicates treatment issues. Although health insurance systems are available, treatment of some aspects or of all NTMs in the system is not included.

Unusual diseases are one of the best public health challenges of the 21st century. The social and economic impact of non-shared diseases threatens progress towards sustainable development. Uncommon diseases are the leading cause of death, resulting in 16 million premature deaths each year. The four major groups of extraordinary diseases – cardiovascular disease, cancer, respiratory illness and chronic diabetic – account for 82% of all non-fatal deaths3. By 2025, the global economic costs of four of these groups are expected to exceed $ 51 trillion. Despite the common belief that unidentified diseases are a “disease of prosperity” affecting only the populations of rich countries, the unknown diseases do not affect people in low-income and middle-income countries. The possibility of premature deaths due to unusual diseases in a low- and middle-income country is four times higher than in high-income countries. For young people, it is important to understand non-shared diseases and their risks. Two-thirds of adult deaths are related to childhood5 or youth behavior: over 150 million young people smoke, 5 81% of young people do not get enough physical activity, 6 11.7% of teens have episodic heavy consumption and 41 million Focused behaviors and unhealthy living conditions are assured that ill-health continues to affect generations.

CONCLUSIONS..

Coordinated systems at the community level are needed to support young people. To support children’s development, the infrastructure must be in one or more systems (public health, health care, education, community facilities) to support and fund culturally appropriate prevention measures. Likewise, the benefits or savings of avoiding a system (eg, education, justice) can occur, requiring a broader and broader view of the community. For example, the result of a family policy intervention in the health care system may be a child who succeeds in academia or who has less legal difficulty. Sharing the costs and benefits of agency and program interventions will likely open new opportunities for key breakthroughs.